ER&D Professional Development Offerings – Spring 2017

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ZERD 100: Peer Support – An Introduction to Teaching (2c)

Delivery Method: Blended - Mondays (2/6, 2/13, 3/6, 3/13, 4/3, 4/10, 5/1, and 5/8; from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.), plus online hours

Peer Support introduces and models research-based teaching best practices and prepares participants for teaching at MATC. Participants learn the basics of navigating MATC systems, digital communication, classroom management, teaching methods and assessments, and the basic neuroscience of teaching and learning. Participants are paired with an experienced instructor who has been trained in peer mentoring. This relationship and the course offer new instructors a safe place in which to learn about MATC, to ask questions about the college and about teaching, as well as to share successes and challenges from the classroom. This FQAS course is required for new faculty but can also be completed for “renewal” credit.

ZERD 100: Peer Support – An Introduction to Teaching (2c)

Delivery Method: Blended – Saturdays (3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 3/25; from 9:00 a.m. – 3:55 p.m.), plus online hours
Peer Support introduces and models research-based teaching best practices and prepares participants for teaching at MATC. Participants learn the basics of navigating MATC systems, digital communication, classroom management, teaching methods and assessments, and the basic neuroscience of teaching and learning. Participants are paired with an experienced instructor who has been trained in peer mentoring. This relationship and the course offer new instructors a safe place in which to learn about MATC, to ask questions about the college and about teaching, as well as to share successes and challenges from the classroom. This FQAS course is required for new faculty but can also be completed for “renewal” credit.
 
ZERD 101: Understanding Classroom Environments (2c)
Delivery Method: Online
This course examines several factors that contribute to an effective classroom environment at MATC. These include understanding the adult learner, promoting a culture of student success, respecting diversity, and developing appropriate teaching strategies. In addition, participants examine how their own behaviors and mindset impact the classroom environment. This FQAS course is required for new faculty but can also be completed for “renewal” credit.
 
ZERD 102: Instructional Planning (2c)
Delivery Method: Online
This course guides participants through the creation of a course instructional plan and individual learning plans. Participants will align instructional and assessment strategies to identified competencies and learning objectives.  Additionally, participants will communicate assessment results to promote student learning and incorporate inclusive learning strategies by evaluating resources available at Milwaukee Area Technical College.  This FQAS course is required for new faculty but can also be completed for “renewal” credit.
 
ZERD 011: Preparation for Online Teaching (2c)
Delivery Method: Online
This course will provide participants with an introduction to developing an online course, based on best practices. The course will provide a theoretical framework for understanding adult learners and online course design. Participants will develop or revise an online course through incorporation of a course design plan and module learning plans that situate alignment of learning activities, teaching strategies and assessments. Blackboard will be utilized as the content management system. This course is required for new faculty interested in teaching online courses at MATC.
 
Register TODAY…via Infonline…

Veterans on Campus Workshop

VOC Boarder

ER&D, in collaboration with the Military Education Support Office (MESO), is excited to offer a workshop designed to guide instructors and staff about military cultural competency and best practices for creating a supportive environment for student veterans.

The 90 minute workshop will include role-play scenarios and discussions; learners will obtain hands-on experience and practice managing challenging behaviors.

Attendees may earn hours toward certification and FQAS renewal in the area of “Teaching Excellence”.

We would like to service all interested faculty and staff…therefore, look for a future email regarding online workshop opportunities.

Each workshop is limited to 12 seats…Register TODAY via Sum Total…
For more information, and to register, search your gmail archives for an email from ER&D.

Free Webinar, Online Viewing

To view this pre-recorded online seminar, follow this link: http://www.magnapubs.com/handouts/?cid=1022. You will also have access to a powerpoint and other resources. The link is active until October 24. We will have the seminar available on CD shortly after that.

Don’t Let Incivility Disrupt Learning in Your Classroom

There is a difference between disagreement and conflict. Disagreement can spawn debate, which can deepen understanding of a concept. Conflict can raise tension and derail learning. While there is a place for disagreement on college and university campuses, there is no room for conflict.

Surveys indicate that one of every five students periodically displays some form of resistance to learning or hostility within the learning environment. Some students arrive late, fall asleep, or habitually miss class. Others argue with other students or the instructor. These behaviors—and others like them—are troubling on their own. What’s worse is that they are highly contagious and will spread to other students if the instructor is unprepared to quickly address and resolve them.

There is no such thing as a tolerable amount of incivility. A little disruptive behavior begets more disruptive behavior, and soon a healthy classroom environment devolves into an unhealthy one that does not support learning and that distresses other students. Negativity pervades the class. Some students become overtly hostile and disrespectful to their peers and instructors. Eventually, the class is overcome with contemptuous students who resist completing homework or participating in discussions. And that’s not what anyone signed up for.

Student incivility interferes with learning, but it doesn’t have to. Learn what you can do to create more supportive classrooms and defuse tension before it escalates, as well as how to handle those rare instances when even the best conflict mitigation tactics fail in Student Incivility: Strategies to Prevent and Respond to Conflict, a Magna Online Seminar.