Closed Captions on Instructional Video Benefits All Students

If you use instructional video in your courses, are you providing your students with alternative methods of experiencing the video’s content, such as closed captions or text transcripts?

Defining Closed Captions

You may be thinking, why is this important?

It is a Legal Requirement!

Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act obligates all schools or agencies receiving federal funds to provide accessible content, or comparable accessible versions of content, to learners with disabilities. This means that all instructional videos must have closed captions, transcripts, and be available in accessible video player.

It Can Benefit All Learners

According to a recent article by Educause Review, all learners can benefit from closed captions because it…

  • Gives students a better chance at using and understanding content by supporting different learning styles and aiding comprehension.
  • Promotes engagement with video by allowing students to choose how they will experience the video’s content.
  • Minimizes language barriers – transcripts can be translated.
  • Supports viewing in situated learning environments – video can be muted and viewed in sound-sensitive environments.

What Can You Do?

For videos you created yourself that are under 15 minutes long, you may request the FIC video transcription service or use YouTube’s built-in tools to host and add accurate closed captions. To learn more about video accessibility with YouTube, see our presentation and video accessibility rubric.

For videos you did not create yourself, contact the video’s copyright owner to inquire about obtaining the video in a closed captioned format. You cannot add closed captions to videos to which you do not have copyright permission.

Lastly, you may consider adopting online videos that are already prepared with closed captions, such as those provided through Films on Demand.

Project Access Seminar – Supporting Student Success for Deaf or Hard of Hearing Students

Deaftec Seminar Flyer Image

Faculty, Administrators and Staff who work with or plan to work with Deaf or Hard of Hearing students are encouraged to attend this one-day seminar focused on providing the skills and information needed to increase success for Deaf or Hard of Hearing students in a mainstream classroom. A complimentary lunch will be provided! See this event flyer for more details.

Event Details
Friday, September 8th, 2017 8 A.M. – 4 P.M.
Milwaukee Campus, room M605

To attend, complete the Online RSVP Form before Wednesday, August 30, 2017.

Adding Closed Captions to Your Own Instructional Videos

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Instructors who create their own instructional videos must provide learners with closed captions and text transcripts of the video’s content to be in compliance with Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Closed captions are text subtitles that can be turned on or off when viewing a video. They are different from open captions, which is text that is always visible and “burned” into the video.

Closed Caption Options

Option One – Do It Yourself
Instructors are strongly encouraged to use their MATC Google Apps YouTube accounts to host and caption videos. YouTube videos support closed captions, transcripts, and are accessible on mobile devices.

Option Two – Request Transcription
You may request assistance from the Faculty Innovation Center (FIC) to transcribe your video into a caption file that you can pair with your video on YouTube.  After receiving a caption file from FIC staff, you must upload the caption file to your YouTube video. The captions in the file will automatically sync with the YouTube video’s timings.

Requirements

  • To be compliant with US copyright law, FIC Staff can only transcribe videos that instructors have created themselves! For purchased or copyright protected works, the instructor must contact the video’s publisher to legally acquire closed captions.

  • FIC Staff will transcribe video that is provided to them in a downloadable digital video file in .MP4 or .MOV format.  If the video is web-based or written to a camcorder mini-DVD, the instructor will need to convert the video to a supported file format before requesting transcription services.

Request Process

If your video is ready for transcription, please use the transcription request form to submit your request and send your video file to the Faculty Innovation Center.

Transcription requests will be completed in the order received; exceptions will be made by request of the Director of Accommodations. Services will be completed within 10 business days of the accepted request unless otherwise indicated.

Once your video has been transcribed, an FIC staff member will send you the video’s closed caption file through email.

Upcoming Webinars: Tips for Testing Website Accessibility, Creating Accessible Online Courses

 

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Upcoming Webinars: Tips for Testing Website Accessibility, Creating Accessible Online Courses, & More
Over the next few months, we will be holding several webinars that will provide tips for creating accessible online content. You can register using the links below to learn about testing for website accessibility, creating accessible online course content, understanding closed captioning standards, implementing universal design, making lecture capture accessible, and developing workflows for closed captioning.
3Play Media | Upcoming Webinars
11 ½ Free Tools for Testing Website Accessibility11 ½ Free Tools for Testing Website Accessibility
Thursday, October 1, 1pm CT

In this webinar, David Berman, the #1 rated speaker on the topic of web accessibility standards as well as an international expert in the field, will share with you the best tools his team uses when auditing and testing websites and documents. Having an excellent test regimen is a crucial part of online accessibility, and David has found the best tools to fit your workflow, platforms, and competencies… so you don’t have to!
Register Now >>


10 Tips for Creating Accessible Online Course Content10 Tips for Creating Accessible Online Course Content
Thursday, October 8, 1pm CT

With recent lawsuits in higher education and updates to Section 508 on the horizon, it is more important than ever that online learning content be made accessible to students with disabilities. In this webinar, Janet Sylvia, Web Accessibility Group Leader and Web Accessibility Trainer, will provide you with 10 tips for making your online course material accessible.
Register Now >>


Understanding Closed Captioning Standards and GuidelinesUnderstanding Closed Captioning Standards and Guidelines
Thursday, October 22, 1pm CT

In this webinar, Jason Stark from the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) and Cindy Camp from Pepnet 2 will go over DCMP’s captioning guidelines and preferred techniques that will help you produce captions that are accurate, consistent, clear, readable, and equal.
Register Now >>


Implementing Universal and Inclusive Design for Online Learning AccessibilityImplementing Universal and Inclusive Design for Online Learning Accessibility
Thursday, November 5, 1pm CT

This webinar will discuss how the principles of universal and inclusive design can be applied to the online learning environment, with a particular focus on the accessibility of course content and materials.
Register Now >>


How to Implement Accessible Lecture CaptureHow to Implement Accessible Lecture Capture
Thursday, December 3, 1pm CT

In this webinar, Christopher Soran, the Interim eLearning Director at Tacoma Community College, along with Ari Bixhorn from Panopto and Lily Bond from 3Play Media, will discuss how you can implement accessible lecture capture at your university. Looking at Tacoma’s workflow, they will walk you through an efficient, cost-effective way to manage closed captioning for lecture capture at a university level.
Register Now >>


Quick Start to CaptioningQuick Start to Captioning
Thursday, December 10, 1pm CT

Watch this webinar to learn the basics of how to add closed captions to online video to make it fully accessible, searchable, and SEO-friendly. This webinar covers Section 508 and ADA accessibility compliance, creation of closed captions, explanation of caption formats and video player compatibility, as well as an overview of automated workflows and integration with lecture capture and video platforms.
Register Now >>

Upcoming Webinars: Captioning Video & YouTube for Higher Ed

 

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Upcoming Webinars: YouTube for Higher Ed, DIY Captioning Workflows, and HTML5
Over the next month and a half, we will be holding five webinars on video accessibility that will provide you with actionable tips for building accessible video into your institution. You can register using the links below to learn about leveraging Google apps for higher education, DIY workflows for closed captioning, and the latest HTML5 video updates.
3Play Media | Upcoming Webinars
Empowering YouTube for Higher EducationEmpowering YouTube for Higher Education
Thursday, July 9, 1 pm CST

This webinar will teach you how to leverage your YouTube videos to create an engaging learning portal for your students. Justin McCutcheon, the CEO and co-founder of Cattura, will walk you through the tools available for utilizing learning solutions that bridge Google Apps for Education, YouTube, and other Google services to create a rich video experience for your YouTube videos directly inside of your learning management system course.
Register Now >>


Closed Captioning with MediaCoreClosed Captioning Workflows for MediaCore
Wednesday, July 15, 1 pm CST

This webinar will teach you how to add closed captions and subtitles to your MediaCore videos to make them fully accessible. You’ll learn about accessibility laws, how closed captions benefit all users, why captioning is important to your institution, recommendations for your captioning strategy, and an overview of 3Play Media’s captioning integration with MediaCore.
Register Now >>


DIY Workflows for Captioning and TranscriptionDIY Workflows for Captioning and Transcription
Thursday, July 23, 1 pm CST

While using a 3rd party captioning service certainly makes the captioning and transcription process easier for video producers, sometimes it is not a plausible solution (mainly due to cost). In this webinar, Ken Petri, the Director of the Ohio State University Web Accessibility Center, will walk you through the process of DIY captioning. At OSU, Ken has developed standards and techniques for captioning that are an exemplary resource for other institutions looking to implement a similar workflow. Ken will give you a comprehensive overview of the DIY captioning process.
Register Now >>


Quick Start to CaptioningQuick Start to Captioning
Thursday, August 6, 1 pm CST

Learn the basics of how to add closed captions or subtitles to make your videos fully accessible, searchable, and SEO-friendly. This webinar covers Section 508 and ADA accessibility compliance, creation of closed captions, explanation of caption formats and video player compatibility, as well as an overview of automated workflows and integration with lecture capture and video platforms.
Register Now >>


HTML5 Video AccessibilityHTML5 Video Accessibility: Updates, Features, & Guidelines
Thursday, August 27, 1 pm CST

What are the best practices for making web-based video and audio accessible? In this webinar, John Foliot, a video accessibility expert and contributor to the W3C’s new Media Accessibility User Requirements (MAUR), will go over the latest updates to HTML5 video as well as new guidelines for making media accessible on the web.
Register Now >>

 

Recorded Webinar: How Copyright and Fair Use Impact Third Party Captioning for Educational Video

Recorded Webinar
Aired on 04/02/2015

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Watch Webinar: How Copyright and Fair Use Impact Third Party Captioning for Educational Video 

We’re sorry you couldn’t attend this webinar on April 2. Below, is a video recording of the webinar that includes closed captions and a searchable interactive transcript.

http://www.3playmedia.com/how-it-works/webinars/copyright-04-02-2015/

Webinar Description
One of the great challenges of using videos that you don’t own is that accessibility laws require most educational institutions (as well as government programs and other industries) to provide closed captions for video content. This is where copyright law can interfere. Blake Reid, an Assistant Clinical Professor in Technology Policy and Telecom Law at Colorado Law, walks you through the conflict between copyright law and captioning law, focusing on the legality of captioning videos that you don’t own. The topics covered are:

  • Captioning laws and regulations
  • The conflict between captioning and copyright
  • Statutory exemptions
  • Fair use
  • The future of copyright and captioning

Three Free Webinars: Copyright Law, YouTube on Video Accessibility, and PDF Accessibility

How Copyright and Fair Use Impact Third Party Captioning for  Educational VideoHow Copyright and Fair Use Impact Third Party Captioning for Educational Video
April 2, 2015 at 1pm – 1:45pm CSTOne of the great challenges of using videos that you don’t own is that accessibility laws require most educational institutions (as well as government programs and other industries) to provide closed captions for video content. This is where copyright law can interfere. Blake Reid, an Assistant Clinical Professor in Technology Policy and Telecom Law at Colorado Law, will walk you through the conflict between copyright law and captioning law, focusing on the legality of captioning videos that you don’t own.
Register now!

The Future of Video Player AccessibilityThe Future of Video Player Accessibility
April 22, 2015 at 1pm – 2:00pm CSTIn this webinar, developers from YouTube/Google, JW Player, Video.js, and University of Washington will come together to discuss video player accessibility. Taking a look at their different players, we will discuss the current capabilities, known shortcomings, and plans for future development. This webinar will provide a forum for major developers to take a top-level look at the future potential of video player accessibility.
Register now!

Creating Accessible PDFs with Acrobat: Requirements, Implementation, and  EvaluationCreating Accessible PDFs with Acrobat: Requirements, Implementation, and Evaluation
April 30, 2015 at 2pm – 3pm ETIn this webinar, the Chief Accessibility Officer of SSB BART Group, Jonathan Avila, will walk you through the requirements for PDF accessibility. He will provide you with implementation and evaluation techniques that you can follow to create accessible documents with Acrobat XI. You’ll learn how to provide textual alternatives for visual elements as well as how to use various Acrobat tools that will make accessibility implementation as simple as possible.
Register now!

Blackboard Learn+: Universal Design and Accessibility for Online Learning

Blackboard Learn+: Universal Design and Accessibility for Online Learning

A stand-alone course for instructors and content developers that explores what accessibility and universal design mean and how they can be applied to online learning.

This course is meant as a stepping off point for building online courses that are usable and accessible. The content is intended to inspire further exploration and advocacy for designing materials that benefit students and help them achieve their educational goals.

Go through the material presented at your own pace. There is no set order or dependencies. Use the Course Menu links to access the content and resources. The Syllabus gives you the course goals and suggested reading material. The Course Content is organized into four modules:

  • Universal Design
  • Accessibility
  • Assistive Technology
  • Learning Styles

Start off by watching the video Campus Leaders Talk About Accessibility, linked below, to gain a perspective of how executives are thinking about accessibility and what drives them to change. How can you use these ideas to promote accessibility at your institution? Feel free to share your experiences on the Discussion Board.

Future of Video Accessibility According to Google

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Industry Insights
Future of Video Accessibility According to Google

One of Google’s top objectives is to make information universally accessible. YouTube has embraced this directive by making video accessibility a priority from the top down. In this recorded session, Google provides insights into the future of accessible video, why universal accessibility is important to Google, and how captions and subtitles enhance content discoverability (Google even reveals test results showing the SEO benefits of captions).

Future of Video Accessibility According to Google

Watch this recording to learn:

  • How Google is building accessibility into YouTube
  • Google’s test results showing the SEO benefits of captions
  • Future of YouTube’s automatic captions
  • Why YouTube creators should caption their videos
  • How to take advantage of YouTube’s international growth through translation and subtitles
  • How Google is addressing the challenges of accessible mobile video