[WEBINAR] Creating a connection with students in online courses

 

Connecting with students in a fully online course

Innovations in Integrations Webinars

Connecting with students presents a unique challenge to fully online instructors. Join us for this next innovations in integrations webinar as Professor Rego shares best practices to overcome this obstacle by using the NBC Learn integration with Blackboard for a picture-perfect student engagement experience.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017, at 1:00 pm Central 
Presenter: Rodolfo Rego
Digital Instructor
Florida International University
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ER&D Spring 2017 Technology Tool Shop

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ZERD 094: Technology Tool Shop I (1c)

The college has an incredible inventory of innovative technologies to enhance teaching and learning, but it is difficult for faculty to find the time to explore these technologies and implement into a curriculum. This workshop helps bridge that gap. Participants will design their own curriculum specific project using the technology of their choice. This will be accomplished with the assistance and guidance of “technology mentors”. Participants will also review pedagogical best practices for instruction with new technologies. This FQAS course can be completed for “renewal” credit.

ZERD 012: Technology Tool Shop II

This advanced technology course will scaffold from the concepts explored in Technology Tool Shop I.  Participants will continue to build upon their curriculum-specific project or choose a new project to explore, using the technology of their choice.  This will be accomplished with the assistance and guidance of “technology mentors”. Participants will also review pedagogical best practices for instruction with new technologies.

FORMAT

DATES

TIME

LOCATION

Face to Face Workshops

Monday, May 22, 2017

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

9 a.m – 2 p.m.

(w/ 45 min lunch)

S120 and various computer labs

Independent Work w/Technology Guide(s)

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

various computer labs

5 Ways to Make Your Online Classrooms More Interactive

Faculty Focus | Higher Ed Teaching & Learning

By: Amy Peterson

The convenience and flexibility of the online learning environment allows learners to develop new skills and further their education, regardless of where they live. However, for all of its benefits, online learning can sometimes feel isolating for students and faculty. The question is: how do you build a sense of community in your online courses? One approach involves cultivating more interaction—between you and your students and among the students themselves. Here are five practical tips for increasing the human connection in your online classrooms.

1. Integrate real-time interaction

college student sitting outside with laptopWhen online courses are completely asynchronous, there is often limited interaction between you and your students and class members with each other. Consider, for example, that real-time conversations don’t occur during a video lecture, when you post announcements, or when students post on a discussion board. That lag in response time kills the momentum of a back-and-forth discussion and can sometimes lead to misunderstandings.

Integrating opportunities for real-time interaction into your online course can help change that and develop a sense of community in a course. Consider how impromptu conversations outside the traditional classroom forge relationships, clarify ideas, and spark new insights. You can facilitate these interactions by setting up opportunities for class members to meet online synchronously both formally and informally. Using web conferencing applications, you can create a variety of synchronous interaction opportunities, such as office hours, small group discussions, whole class discussions, and study groups.

2. Get creative with discussion boards

Discussion boards have long been the communication staple for online courses, but there are ways you can make this experience more interactive for much wider and deeper participation. In a traditional classroom, it’s common for only a small percentage of students to participate in discussion. In an online environment, you can structure your discussions so that everyone contributes, plus they’ll have more time to consider what they want to say before responding. Class size helps determine how you organize discussions. In a larger class of, say, 100 students, you can set up smaller discussion groups of 20 or so people so that students can get to know their fellow classmates. You can also create even smaller groups (5-7 people) for more intimate interaction, and rotate these groups to expand interactions. This approach also works with smaller class sizes.

One technique that fosters richer dialogue is creating discussion prompts that are open ended, such as requiring students to provide examples or asking them to interpret a concept from a variety of perspectives. You could also set up student-facilitated discussion opportunities where students craft the discussion prompt and guide the ensuing dialogue.

3. Maximize engagement with non-task interaction

Non-task interactions are those exchanges that are not part of the direct learning, but help create a supportive learning community. You can facilitate these types of interactions by leveraging the social networking capabilities that are available in many learning management systems, such as chat and web conferencing. Using the group functionality, students can create special interest groups or study groups. If your LMS doesn’t have the functionality to support a social network, you can still create one with a private Facebook page or one of the many group messaging apps available, such as Telegram and Slack.

information overload computer keyOf important note, academic social networks require planning and ongoing maintenance. The value of the social network needs to be explicit before it will become a common destination. Many schools begin by asking students to create bios and add profile pictures, but these activities alone will not encourage students to keep coming back to the network. Techniques for transforming the social network into a destination include frequently updating content (on a weekly or if possible daily basis) and incorporating contributions to the social network into classes (e.g. using the social network tools for group work; asking students to post their discussion contributions into their social network feed).

4. Use multiple communication tools

You’re not alone in wanting to increase and enhance student engagement and interaction. For example, schools can create a program-wide social network that allows students to continue their relationships with other students from course to course. Within this private social network, the administrators and support staff can use direct messages, announcements, and live events to enhance student engagement in the program.

This sort of institutional support is not necessary, however, for your class to be interactive. In addition to external social networking tools, such as Facebook, Telegram, Slack, and WhatsApp, students can meet each other in real time on Skype and Google Hangouts. Preprogrammed communication, such as introductory videos, content presentation, and email, are still important components of online learning, but student interaction can take the learning further, faster.

5. Have a plan around the tool

A tech tool is only as good as you the way you use it from a pedagogical perspective. When you move a face-to-face course online, or create an online course from scratch, consider how interaction will support the learning goals in your course. By enhancing the opportunities for interaction in your online classrooms, you can take an already powerful learning opportunity to the next level for all of your students.

Amy Peterson is senior vice president of course design, development and academic research at Pearson. She has more than 15 years of experience developing online and hybrid courses and learning experiences for dozens of universities and colleges.

Introducing G Suite for Education

A new name for Google Apps: G Suite

Presented by Jonathan Rochelle
DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT MANAGEMENT, GOOGLE FOR EDUCATION

G Suite for Education is the same set of apps that you know and love—Gmail, Docs, Drive, Calendar, Hangouts, and more— but designed with new intelligent features that make work easier and bring teachers and students together.

Smarter spreadsheets

 Google

We launched Explore in Google Sheets to help summarize spreadsheet data with automated charts and insights. But many students might not experience the full value of spreadsheets because they can’t write formulas. This is a case of the computer requiring you to speak its language. Machine intelligence turns this upside down, so now the computer understands your language. Students can simply enter a question using natural language and Explore in Google Sheets will use Natural Language Processing to translate the question into a formula and offer an instant answer.

Smarter documents

We’ve also added Explore in Google Docs with machine intelligence to automatically recommend related topics to learn about, images to insert, and more content to discover. Students can even use Explore in Google Docs to find a related document from Drive, so they spend less time switching between apps and more time polishing their assignments.  And educators will be happy to hear that image searches performed using Explore limit results to those that comply with SafeSearch and are approved for use with Creative Commons.

Smarter presentations

For students, making a presentation inspiring can be a lot of work. Often, students spend more time formatting slides than thinking creatively about the story they want to tell. Now, as students add content to a presentation, Explore in Google Slides dynamically offers layout suggestions that help the content shine. In just a couple of clicks, students can create polished presentations that bring their ideas to life. The best thing about these intelligent features is that they’ll continue to learn and improve over time the more they’re used, and save students even more time tomorrow than they save them today.

Smarter scheduling

Finding time to meet with other teachers can be hard, especially when the list of people and locations you’re coordinating starts to grow. Google Calendar uses machine intelligence to help you easily find a time when invitees are free, and it also suggests available rooms based on your previous bookings. And, when the list of invitees grows long and no times are available, Calendar will suggest times across the group where the conflicts are easiest to resolve, such as recurring 1:1 meetings.

Learn more about the new name and features.

National Distance Learning Week Nov. 7, 2016 – Nov. 11, 2016 • Virtual

Monday, November 7 | 12:00 – 1:00pm CST

Trends in Alternative Credentialing: Benchmarks, Badges, and Noncredit Programming Webinar

Micro-credentials, nano-credentials, badges…staying current on emerging trends in education is a challenge. It is also the life-force of the work that we do to prepare students for an ever-shifting professional landscape. In this engaging session, learn about the driving factors behind the emergence of alternative credentials, how higher education institutions are responding, and hear insights about what’s next.

Sign Up 

Upcoming November Workshop: Google Apps Online Orientation

Google  Apps Workshop Notice

In this one-hour online training session, faculty and staff will be oriented to the online Google Apps workshop to review using Google Gmail and Google Calendar.

Seating is limited – - complete the Registration Form to reserve your seat by November 3rd! Select one (1) session:

  • November 10th, 2016 11:00 am – 12:00 Noon
  • November 17th, 2016 11:00 am – 12:00 Noon

If you have questions about the workshop, contact:

Mernathan Sykes
sykesm@matc.edu
414-297-6890

 

Innovation Grant Application Opportunity

A message from Dr. Mohammad Dakwar:

You are invited to submit a proposal for an Innovation Grant through the Provost’s Office which will provide support to projects and activities that focus on innovation and student success.

Innovation grants are intended to encourage faculty and staff to be visionary, creative and innovative.  Our working definition of innovation is people creating value by implementing new ideas.  I encourage you to consider submitting your ideas to create value and transform lives through innovative education for the betterment of our students and community.

Application Deadline - October 28, 2016

Innovation Grant Application

MATC Merit Badge Clinic

Dear Faculty,
“Great opportunity!  Please see important message below and make every effort to participate in this unique program.” `Mohammad Dakwar, Ed.D. Provost


Please note the following changes:

Date has been changed to Saturday, November 12th - same date as Open House
All Merit Badge Clinics need to be offered at the Milwaukee Campus.

PLEASE SUBMIT INFORMATION by Tuesday, September 22nd

MATC is partnering with the The Boy Scouts of America, Three Harbors Council to provide a Merit Badge Clinic. All of the initial logistics are listed below. We are asking each school to identify 3 to 4 or more programs that align with the merit badges (see link below) that would highlight the programs in each school.. Not all of the requirements need to me met on the day of the clinic. Scouts may be required to have pre-requisites before the clinic or complete activities after the clinic. Please see the Gateway Tech link for more information below.

Please complete the form below for merit badges that your school can offer. Please feel free to contact me with any questions – Rich Busalacchi - busalacr@matc.edu

DATE CHANGE - Saturday, November 12 (this is the same day as out open house). Our thought is to maximize our resources and allow Scouts and Parents to participate in open house before the clinic.

-MATC’s program will be modeled after the Merit Badge Tech program at Gateway
https://www.gtc.edu/merit-badge-tech

-There are a total of 135 merit badges available — many align with MATC programs
http://www.scouting.org/meritbadges.aspx

-Scouts will be ages 12 – 18 (middle/high school)
-Each scout is charged an $8 fee for the program
-An MATC faculty and merit badge leader (assigned by Boy Scouts) will lead each session
-MATC will arrange for catering (granola bars/juice in the morning and boxed lunches)
-3-4 merit badge programs from each school program (CHANGE – as a result of aligning program with Open House – all clinics need to be held on the Milwaukee Campus).
-Idea is to showcase facilities and campus specific programs
-Parents are welcome to visit the merit badge sessions; transportation and lunch on their own.
-Registration will be open 10/19 – 11/12; once sessions are full, they are cut off (no wait list)

Tentative Agenda for the Day

  • 7:30am Registration
  • 8:00am Opening session in Cooley
  • 8:30am Scouts attend Open House – participate in scavenger hunt and visit programs that are being offered as merit badge clinics
  • 9:15am Scouts meet merit badge leaders and instructors at assigned meeting point and are led to merit badge clinic
  • Noon – Break for lunch
  • 3:00pm Merit badge sessions wrap up;
  • 3:15 pm Scouts meet in Cooley for Closing Session
  • 3:30 pm Closing ceremonies in Cooley – Event Concludes

MATC Merit Badge Clinic Form*

*Log into your MATC Google Account to access form

Prevent Cheating During Exams with Respondus

Instructor Trainings with Respondus

This September, attend a 45-minute training session on how to effectively use Respondus applications for online testing. Learn how to create online assessments with Respondus 4, or see how to prevent cheating during online exams using LockDown Browser.

Sign up today to learn how to use these applications!

LockDown Browser & Respondus Monitor: Prevent Cheating During Online Exams

Tuesday, September 13 at 2pm CT

Wednesday, September 28 at 1pm CT

Respondus 4.0: Create & Manage Exam Content

Thursday, September 8 at 1pm CT

Google Apps Update – Calendar

 

Launch of Reminders for Google Calendar on the web

Google has announced that Reminders are now available in Google Calendar on the web.
New features:
Set a reminder for a specific time and date and get notified when it’s time. To create a reminder, tap on a time in the calendar grid, then select “Reminder.”
  • Reminders carry forward to the next day, until you mark them done. To mark a reminder as done, simply click on the reminder, and click ‘Mark as done’.
  • Reminders created in the Google app, Keep, and Inbox will also show in Google Calendar.
  • Reminders on the web will sync to your Google Calendar Android and iOS apps.

Please note:

  • Reminders are private to calendar owners and are not viewable, even if your calendar is shared with others.
  • Google Tasks users will not be prompted to use the Reminders feature. It can be enabled from the drop down menu on the Tasks calendar.

 

Google Apps Update – Drive

Set expiration dates for access to Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, and Slides files

Google has added a new feature to Google Drive.  According to Google, this new feature helps keep your organization’s information safe. Google is introducing the ability to set an “expiration date” for specific user access to files in Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, and Slides.

For instance, imagine a student receives an incomplete in your course. To complete the course, the student needs to view a spreadsheet, doc, or presentation containing pertinent information about the course. Following this launch, you’ll be able to share docs, spreadsheets, and presentations with the student, give them view access-only, and set that access to expire at the end of the semester. If the student attempts to open the spreadsheet after the expiration date has passed, they’ll be denied access.

Please note that you’ll only be able to set expiration dates for users with comment or view access; you will not be able to set expiration dates for file owners or users with edit access.